Image

Condom Ad

Condom Ad

In 1991, Fox Network, during a quirky teen show known as Howard’s Head, aired what is known as network TV’s first condom advert. By playing the 15 second ad from condom maker Trojan, Fox brushed aside a long held taboo. This type of ad was essentially only allowed because of the rising awareness of AIDS and prevention of STDs.

In 2007, Trojan attempted to air an ad in which there is a bar filled with women, and the men are portrayed by pigs fumbling about on their cellphones. One of them slips into the bathroom and procures a condom through a vending machine—emerging out a spry young man in his twenties. The ad would end with the message “Evolve. Use a condom every time.”

The ad was rejected by two of the four major networks—namely Fox and CBS—both of which had accepted Trojan’s previous campaign. The new campaign was rejected because it had crossed the line between disease prevention and pregnancy prevention.

Advertisements
Image

Suicide Broadcast Live

Suicide Broadcast Live

On June 23, 1938, Marion Perloff jumped from atop the 11-floor-high Time & Life Building (New York) and plummeted to her death. Many other suicides followed the same year. However, Perloff’s suicide leap was the first ever to be recorded on camera. NBC cameraman, Ross Plaisted, was testing his equipment in a nearby building, when he spotted Perloff. He started filming when she reached the sixth floor and followed her all the way to the ground. The actual footage was never broadcast on television.

On July 16, 1974, Christine Chubbuck made the news when, during her TV broadcast, she suddenly went off-script and said, “In keeping with Channel 40′s policy of bringing you the latest in blood and guts, and in living color, you are going to see another first: an attempted suicide.” She then pulled out a gun, placed it by her right ear, and shot herself. The TV channel cut the broadcast. Chubbuck was transported to a hospital, where she wasn’t declared dead for another 14 hours.

Image

Waitomo Caves

Waitomo Caves

The Waitomo Caves are home to a species of glowworm native to New Zealand: Arachnocampa luminosa. They glow in order to draw insects closer, luring them into the silky threads that the glowworms produce and their inevitable tangled doom. Thousands of these glowworms live in the Waitomo Caves, which have become one of the main attractions of New Zealand’s North Island. The Glowworm Grotto is navigable by boat—under the lights of the hundreds of glowworms on the ceiling. The upper chamber includes the Organ Loft and the Catacombs, while the lower level is home to the Cathedral Chamber, whose acoustics are acknowledged by international opera stars.

Image

Eisriesenwelt Cave

Eisriesenwelt Cave

Science
Next Previous Random List
Share

Twitter
Google+
Facebook
Pinterest

Our World
10 Most Interesting Caves In The World

Natalya Bernard November 18, 2013
Check out our new companion site: http://knowledgenuts.com

Caves are often musty, muddy, and damp. They can also be teeming with wildlife, as wide as a canyon, or flooded with icy water. They can be made of marble, crystal, or basalt. Caves are far more than just holes in the ground. Some of them are quite extraordinary.
10 Eisriesenwelt Cave

ice cave
Photo credit: Werckmeister

The Eisriesenwelt Cave in Austria is the world’s largest ice cave, with a length of almost 50 kilometers (30 mi). Its name translates to “World of the Ice Giants.” Discovered in 1879, its myriad chambers are interconnected, allowing air to flow through all chambers. This also means that the caves can get chilly, so winter wear is appropriate for all visits. The ice formations are different colors due to the mineral content.

The caves are located above Werfen Village in Salzburg. Lamps are handed out to tourists before the tour, and sometimes the ice formations are lit with magnesium lamps for dramatic effect. Only a portion of the cave’s length is open to the public.

Image

The Summer’s Triumph Tapestry

The Summer’s Triumph Tapestry

The tapestry known as Summer’s Triumph was created in Bruges (the capital of West Flanders province in the Flemish Region of Belgium) around 1538. Currently, it resides in the Bayerisches National Museum.

Summer’s Triumph is famous (or infamous) among conspiracy theorists because it clearly depicts a number of distinctly UFO-like objects flying in the skies. Although their presence is baffling, some speculate they may have been added in the tapestry (which depicts a victorious ruler’s ascension to power) in order to connect the UFOs to the ruler as a symbol of divine intervention. This, of course, raises more questions than answers, such as: Why would the 16th-century Belgians recognize flying saucers and mentally connect them with divinity?

Image

Ancient Aeroplanes

Ancient Aeroplanes

Incas and other pre-Columbian people left behind some extremely puzzling trinkets. Some of the strangest are probably the so-called Ancient Aeroplanes, which are small, golden figures that closely resemble modern jet planes. Originally thought to be zoomorphic (meant to resemble animals), the statues were soon found to have features that look very much like fighter planes’ wings, stabilizing tails, and even landing gears. They were aerodynamic enough that when ancient astronaut believers (allegedly) made model planes with their proportions and fitted them with propellers and (again, allegedly) jet engines, they flew perfectly. All of this has led to speculation that the Incas may have been in contact with (likely extraterrestrial) people who were able to build advanced jet planes, and who perhaps even possessed the technology themselves.

Well, that, or these wonderful statuettes might just be artistic representations of bees, flying fish, or other winged creatures. As always, the beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Image

The Williams Enigmalith

The Williams Enigmalith

In 1998, a hiker named John J. Williams noticed a strange metallic protrusion in the dirt. He dug up a strange-looking rock which, upon cleaning, turned out to have a weird electrical component attached to it. The electric device was clearly man-made and somewhat resembled an electrical plug.

The rock has since become a well-known mystery in UFO enthusiast circles. It has featured in UFO Magazine and (according to Williams) Fortean Times, a famed magazine devoted to mysterious phenomena. Williams, an electrical engineer, says the electronic component embedded in the stone has not been glued or welded into the granite. In fact, the rock probably formed around the device.

Many believe that the so-called Williams Enigmalith is a hoax, as Williams refuses to break it (but is willing to sell it for $500,000). Also, the stone device does bear a certain resemblance to heat rocks that are commonly used to keep tropical pet lizards warm. Still, geological analysis has apparently determined that the stone is around 100,000 years old, which (if true) would mean the device inside can’t possibly be of human creation. Williams is confident enough to let anyone research the Enigmalith on three conditions: He must be present, the rock must remain unharmed, and he will not have to pay for the research.